Ricotta-Stuffed Zucchini Flowers with Pesto

Italians love to complain about Italy. Seriously, talk to an Italian for a couple minutes and they will 99% of the time start ranting about how nothing works in Italy, how the economy/government/things in general are messed up.  They must take its immense beauty for granted, because I would willingly live with all those problems if I knew I could wake up to this view every morning. Continue reading “Ricotta-Stuffed Zucchini Flowers with Pesto”

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Rainbow Winter Salad

You know what I love about the snow? It’s an automatic conversation topic for when you run into people you kind of know, but not enough for conversation beyond weather.

“OMG snow, amirite?!” Conversation gold. Also, snowball fights.

Anyways, this weekend it snowed a butt-ton, and being snowed-in I decided to try out a recipe from Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi.  I chose this celery salad mostly because I actually had most of the ingredients for it and therefore didn’t need to go outside to gather more things.  Ottolenghi’s recipes have notoriously long ingredient lists, and he likes to call for strange things that you aren’t likely to find easily (pickled walnuts??). Nevertheless, this is a first step towards my goal of trying every recipe in the book, because they all look AMAZING. Continue reading “Rainbow Winter Salad”

Frittata di Spaghetti

 

 

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Despite the frigid weather I’m clinging desperately to summer.  Let’s pretend the beach is still an option.

What foods do you bring to the beach?

 
It would make sense to bring light things that don’t give you a food belly resembling that of a 9-month pregnant woman, right?

If you’re in Sicily, that logic won’t fly.

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Sicilians love their pasta unconditionally, and this nonsense of it having a bloating effect does not faze them in the slightest.  When they make a day trip to the beach (which is usually not very far from home, lets be honest) they bring along a nice, heavy baked pasta dish for a hearty lunch to fuel many more hours under the sun.

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This pasta al forno, or a baked pasta dish, can be eaten warm or at room temperature, and it gets better the longer it sits.  There are tons of different types of pasta al forno you can make, but today I am bringing this quiche-like version to you.  It’s seriously delicious, made with spaghetti, eggs, cream, vegetables, and cheese, and just as good cold as it is warm.  You can feel free to vary the vegetables you use according to your tastes.

Frittata di Spaghetti

100 g cooked spaghetti

olive oil

125 g sliced mushrooms

1 red pepper, diced

80 g frozen peas

6 eggs

250 ml heavy cream

parsley

grated parmesan cheese

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Butter a round pan of about 23 cm in diameter.

Sautee the mushrooms in about 1 tbsp of olive oil for 2-3 minutes, adding salt to taste.  Remove the mushrooms from the pan and use the same pan to cook the peppers, also adding salt to taste.  When the peppers are almost tender, add the frozen peas and cook until the peas are done.  Add the mushrooms back to the pan and mix all the vegetables together.  Set aside.

In a bowl, beat the eggs with the cream and add salt and pepper to taste, then add the cooled cooked spaghetti, chopped parsley, and about ¼ cup grated parmesan cheese.  Add in the vegetables and mix everything together.  Pour the mixture into the greased pan and sprinkle the top with more parmesan cheese, then bake for 25-30 minutes.

Serves about 4.